New Paper on Amphibious Hearing in Pinnipeds in Special Issue of Journal of Comparative Physiology (A)

SEA blog,

Please note the availability of a new special issue of Journal of Comparative Physiology (A) on Sensory Biology of Marine Animals (see below details and link). Within this issue is an original paper lead by Colleen Reichmuth at UCSC <www.pinnipedlab.org> to which SEA’s B. Southall contributed. This paper is available on request.

Comparative assessment of amphibious hearing in pinnipeds

Colleen Reichmuth (1), Marla M. Holt (2), Jason Mulsow (3), Jillian M. Sills (4) and Brandon L. Southall (1, 5)

(1) Long Marine Laboratory, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

(2) Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112, USA

(3) National Marine Mammal Foundation, 2240 Shelter Island Drive, # 200, San Diego, CA 92106, USA

(4) Long Marine Laboratory, Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

(5) SEA Inc., 9099 Soquel Drive, Suite 8, Aptos, CA 95003, USA

 

http://link.springer.com/journal/359/199/6/page/1  

Journal of Comparative Physiology A

Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

Volume 199, Issue 6, June 2013

 

Special Issue: Sensory Biology of Aquatic Mammals

 (13 articles)

Guest Editors: Wolf Hanke, Guido Dehnhardt

Editor-in chief: Friedrich G. Barth

 

Editorial:

Sensory biology of aquatic mammals

Wolf Hanke (1, 2) and Guido Dehnhardt (1, 2)

(1) Institute for Biosciences, Chair of Sensory and Cognitive Ecology, Rostock University, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany

(2) Marine Science Center, Am Yachthafen 3a, 18119 Rostock, Germany

 

Review:

Hydrodynamic perception in true seals (Phocidae) and eared seals (Otariidae)

Wolf Hanke (1), Sven Wieskotten (1), Christopher Marshall (2) and Guido Dehnhardt (1)

(1) Institute for Biosciences, Chair of Sensory and Cognitive Ecology, Rostock University, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany

(2) Department of Marine Biology, Texas A&M University, Galveston, TX 77553, USA 

 

Original Paper:

Detection of hydrodynamic stimuli by the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

Joseph C. Gaspard III (1, 2), Gordon B. Bauer (1, 3), Roger L. Reep (2), Kimberly Dziuk (1), LaToshia Read (1) and David A. Mann (1, 4)

(1) Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium, Sarasota, FL 34236, USA

(2) Aquatic Animal Health Program, Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

(3) Division of Social Sciences, New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL 34243, USA

(4) College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA

 

Original Paper:

Echolocation in Blainville’s beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris)

P. T. Madsen (1), N. Aguilar de Soto (2, 3), P. Arranz (2, 3) and M. Johnson (3)

(1) Department of Bioscience—Zoophysiology, Aarhus University, Build. 1131, Århus, Denmark

(2) Department of Animal Biology, La Laguna University, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain

(3) Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 8LB, Scotland

 

Review:

Gain control in the sonar of odontocetes

Alexander Ya Supin (1) and Paul E. Nachtigall (2)

(1) Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Science, 33 Leninsky Prospect, 119071 Moscow, Russia

(2) Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA

 

Review:

Communication in bottlenose dolphins: 50 years of signature whistle research

Vincent M. Janik (1) and Laela S. Sayigh (2)

(1) Sea Mammal Research Unit, School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 8LB, UK

(2) Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA

 

Original Paper:

Comparative assessment of amphibious hearing in pinnipeds

Colleen Reichmuth (1), Marla M. Holt (2), Jason Mulsow (3), Jillian M. Sills (4) and Brandon L. Southall (1, 5)

(1) Long Marine Laboratory, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

(2) Conservation Biology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2725 Montlake Blvd. East, Seattle, WA 98112, USA

(3) National Marine Mammal Foundation, 2240 Shelter Island Drive, # 200, San Diego, CA 92106, USA

(4) Long Marine Laboratory, Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

(5) SEA Inc., 9099 Soquel Drive, Suite 8, Aptos, CA 95003, USA

 

Original Paper:

Are harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) able to perceive and use polarised light?

Frederike D. Hanke (1), Lars Miersch (1), Eric J. Warrant (2), Fedor M. Mitschke (3) and Guido Dehnhardt (1)

(1) Institute for Biosciences, Sensory and Cognitive Ecology, University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany

(2) Lund Vision Group, Department of Biology, University of Lund, Sölvegatan 35, 22362 Lund, Sweden

(3) Institute for Physics, University of Rostock, Universitätsplatz 3, 18055 Rostock, Germany

 

Original Paper:

Vibrissal touch sensing in the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina): how do seals judge size?

Robyn Grant (1, 2), Sven Wieskotten (3), Nina Wengst (3), Tony Prescott (1) and Guido Dehnhardt (3)

(1) Active Touch Laboratory, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

(2) Division of Biology and Conservation Ecology, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK

(3) Marine Science Center, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany 

Original Paper:

Olfactory discrimination ability of South African fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus) for enantiomers

Sunghee Kim (1), Mats Amundin (2) and Matthias Laska (1)

(1) IFM Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden

(2) Kolmårdens Djurpark, 618 92 Kolmården, Sweden

 

Review:

The neurobiology and behavior of the American water shrew (Sorex palustris)

Kenneth C. Catania (1)

(1) Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B, Box 35-1634, Nashville, TN 37235-1634, USA

 

Review:

Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals

Nicole U. Czech-Damal (1), Guido Dehnhardt (2), Paul Manger (3) and Wolf Hanke (2)

(1) Biocenter Grindel and Zoological Museum, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3, 20146 Hamburg, Germany

(2) Institute for Biosciences, University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 3, 18059 Rostock, Germany

(3) School of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 7 York Road, Parktown, 2193 Johannesburg, South Africa

Review:

Consciousness in dolphins? A review of recent evidence

Heidi E. Harley (1)

(1) Division of Social Sciences, New College of Florida, 5800 Bay Shore Road, Sarasota, FL 34243, USA

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